Bay Medical Headlines

New Technique to open Completely Blocked Ateries

Posted: 08/12/2014 - A local hospital is using new technology to treat patients with totally blocked arteries. It does not require open heart surgery. And with 60% of chronic total occlusion patients unable to receive surgery, this new technique is the perfect fit.
Video

New Technology Finds Lung Cancer Tumors Earlier

Updated: 09/12/2013 - It used to be that a lung cancer diagnosis was a death sentence, but that's not the case today, as doctors have made huge gains in treatment and more importantly diagnosis. Bay Medical Sacred Heart is one of two hospitals in the state using a new lung cancer detection system that can find stage 1 tumors.
Video

Balloon Sinuplasty

Updated: 12/22/2012 - When compared with the rest of the nation, per capita Northwest Florida has a tremendous amount of sinus disease. If those problems begin to affect your daily routine, most often the answer is surgery. In the past that meant at least a day in the hospital and a long recovery time, Now an alternative is being offered in Bay County that can be done right in the doctor’s office.

Local Doctor Calls Neurological Disease an Epidemic

Updated: 10/09/2012 - Panama City- NewsChannel 7 reported Monday about a local five year old little boy suffering from a condition called hydrocephalus or water on the brain. Unfortunately it appears he's not the only one in our area suffering from the neroulogical disease. In fact, one local doctor called it an epidemic.

Cervical Fusion Helps Patient Get Life Back

Posted: 07/20/2012 - Whiplash is a common injury after accidents like car crashes. For most, the pain usually goes away with proper treatment. For those who can't seem to find relief, two local doctors may have come up with a solution. One has a unique x-ray machine; the other uses the results from that machine during surgery.

Bay Medical Designated Level Two Trauma Center

Updated: 05/03/2012 - When there's an accident with severe injuries, getting help quickly is the key to survival. In the past patients in our area were usually life flighted to Pensacola or Tallahassee to a hospital that specializes in treating trauma patients. That's no longer the case.

Hip Replacement Goes Back To The Future

Updated: 02/29/2012 - In the 1950's surgeons used what is called the Smith-Peterson approach for hip replacement. It provided a great view of the hip but surgeons had to cut through muscle which meant a long recovery time. Recently the anterior hip procedure was improved and one local orthopedic surgeon is happy to see its revival.

Heart Health Month is for both Men and Women

Posted: 02/29/2012 - Earlier this month we had Go Red for Women day, where you were encouraged to wear red to bring attention to women's heart health issues. But with February being heart health month we believe you can't get the message out often enough.

More Bay Medical Headlines

Medical News

  • Don't look for emergency contraception soon
    The Obama administration may have backed down after a decade of fighting over emergency contraception, but don’t expect to see Plan B, or any other morning-after birth control product, out from behind the counter anytime soon.
  • Second child files suit for lung transplant, gets on list

    A woman whose son died of cystic fibrosis in 2009 successfully sued on Thursday to get his younger brother, now 11, on the adult waiting list for a lung transplant.A woman whose son died of cystic fibrosis in 2009 successfully sued on Thursday to get his younger brother, now 11, on the adult waiting list for a lung transplant.


  • Sebelius won't intervene in girl's transplant case

    U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius reiterated Tuesday that she won’t intervene in the “incredibly agonizing” case involving a 10-year-old Pennsylvania girl who is waiting for a lung transplant, telling members of Congress that medical experts should make those decisions.U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius reiterated Tuesday that she won’t intervene in the “incredibly agonizing” case involving a 10-year-old Pennsylvania girl who is waiting for a lung transplant, telling members of Congress that medical experts should make those decisions.


  • Insurers pick up $147 million medical tab for young adults

    One of the first provisions of the 2010 health reform law has had its intended effect: shifting costs from hospitals, taxpayers and families to health insurance companies, researchers reported on Thursday. It’s one of the most popular aspects of the law.One of the first provisions of the 2010 health reform law has had its intended effect: shifting costs from hospitals, taxpayers and families to health insurance companies, researchers reported on Thursday. It’s one of the most popular aspects of the law.


  • Health workers strike at UC Calif. medical centers
    Thousands of healthcare workers walked off the job at the University of California's five medical centers on Tuesday, delaying surgeries, diagnostic procedures, treatments and emergency care throughout the state.
  • Probiotics can prevent dangerous diarrhea

    Probiotics — those products that promise to replenish your gut’s 'healthy' microbes — do seem to help prevent dangerous diarrhea, researchers reported on Thursday.Probiotics — those products that promise to replenish your gut’s 'healthy' microbes — do seem to help prevent dangerous diarrhea, researchers reported on Thursday.


  • People think they're eating less than they are

    People may realize that fast food isn’t health food, but they don’t realize just how fattening it really is, researchers report. They surveyed people eating at 10 burger, chicken, sandwich and doughnut chains and found they greatly underestimated just how much they were chowing down.People may realize that fast food isn’t health food, but they don’t realize just how fattening it really is, researchers report. They surveyed people eating at 10 burger, chicken, sandwich and doughnut chains and found they greatly underestimated just how much they were chowing down.


  • Report questioning salt guidelines riles heart experts
    An unusual medical brawl erupted on Tuesday when the influential Institute of Medicine issued a report questioning the basis of years of advice for Americans to cut their salt intake in half.
  • Chris Christie's weight-loss procedure doesn't always work

    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie revealed that he's had gastric-band weight-loss surgery, which experts say has the least amount of short-term risk but also yields the least amount of weight loss.New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie revealed that he's had gastric-band weight-loss surgery, which experts say has the least amount of short-term risk but also yields the least amount of weight loss.


  • Caffeinated gum raises health buzz

    A new line of caffeinated chewing gum is causing jitters among health advocates and prompting federal officials to take a new look at the proliferation of jolt-infused foods, including those marketed to children and teens.A new line of caffeinated chewing gum is causing jitters among health advocates and prompting federal officials to take a new look at the proliferation of jolt-infused foods, including those marketed to children and teens.


  • Don't pull Avandia from market, FDA panel urges
    The controversial diabetes drug Avandia should stay on the market for now, with relaxed restrictions on its use, Food and Drug Administration advisers said on Thursday. Avandia was the world’s No. 1 diabetes drug until research showed in could raise heart risks.
  • Anger may raise heart attack risk, study finds
    Bottling up emotions is thought to harm both mind and body, but a new study suggests that the opposite extreme may be no better.
  • Just one daily soda can raise diabetes risk
    Drinking just one 12-ounce soda a day may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, a new study from Europe suggests.
  • Gut bugs linked to heart attacks, strokes
    Thousands of heart attack victims every year have none of the notorious risk factors before their crisis - not high cholesterol, not unhealthy triglycerides.
  • 12 school football players die each year, study finds
    Each year in the U.S. an average of a dozen high school and college football players die during practices and games, according to a new study that finds heart conditions, heat and other non-traumatic causes of death are twice as common as injury-related ones.
8195 Front Beach Road Panama City Beach, FL 32407 Station: 850-234-7777 News: 850-230-5221 Fax: 850-233-6647 FCC Form 398
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability
Gray Television, Inc.