Baseball

By: Mark Vaughn Email
By: Mark Vaughn Email

High school teams use the summer as a second season, because in today's High School sports era taking the summer off is just not an option anymore.

"If you don't work on your game in baseball you can't succeed." Mosley Senior Jeffrey Pitts said. "Especially at the next level. You might get by in high school off raw talent, but not at the next level."

High School baseball teams from all over the state are practicing, and playing a full season worth of games to stay sharp during the summer and into the fall. "It's a very important time to get some strength, to work on the skills that you really don't have time to during the season." Mosley head baseball coach Todd Harless added. "And to develop the young players and get them ready for the next season ."

Getting in team work year round keeps the players sharp, and helps the teams gain much need chemistry before they ever hit the diamond in the spring.

"It's so important so that we can all get closer, and become friends. We all are now, but before the summer we're all hanging out now. It's important to have that chemistry so we're all used to playing with each other," said Mosley Senior Catcher Dale Ervin.

All these teams hope that putting in the extra work now will pay off when their season starts.

"As soon as the season ends the season begins really. you have to build up to it and try to peak at the right time, right when the state starts," added Pitts.

Mosley playing Wednesday in the final of the 15-16 Dizzy Dean State Tournament, while Mosley's 17-19 year olds won the state tournament and will move on to Play in the World Series in Boynton Georgia on the 22nd.


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
8195 Front Beach Road Panama City Beach, FL 32407 Station: 850-234-7777 News: 850-230-5221 Fax: 850-233-6647 FCC Form 398
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 98370454 - wjhg.com/a?a=98370454