The Nature Conservancy releases 26 eastern indigo snakes at Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve

Eastern indigo snakes were released at The Nature Conservancy's Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines...
Eastern indigo snakes were released at The Nature Conservancy's Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve.(TIM DONOVAN FWC)
Published: Apr. 27, 2022 at 5:29 PM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

BRISTOL, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) - More snakes are slithering in the wild after The Nature Conservancy released the native, nonvenomous animals.

Officials with the conservancy say they released 26 eastern indigo snakes at Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve in Bristol Tuesday. They say the snakes are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. They say they hope releasing the young snakes will help grow the population and help the species recover.

The eastern indigo snake is the longest snake native to North America. Officials say this snake balances wildlife communities by eating small animals including venomous and nonvenomous snakes.

This species recovery effort is a long-term commitment of multiple groups including The Nature Conservancy, the Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens’ Orianne Center for Indigo Conservation, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Welaka National Fish Hatchery, The Orianne Society, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, Southern Company through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida.

Copyright 2022 WJHG. All rights reserved.