Chris Smith

Chief Meteorologist

Connect With Me

chris.smith@wjhg.com


Chris Smith has been the chief meteorologist for the VIPIR7 Storm Team since October 2009. He came to NewsChannel 7 from CNN where he was a meteorologist for CNN, CNN International, and HLN.

Chris and his wife, Maurissa, knew northwest Florida was where they wanted to live and start a family... putting them close to his parents in South Walton and his in-laws in Southwest Georgia. Since moving here they had a son, Charlie.

Chris has more than 20 years of experience. His career has taken him across the Peach State… from Albany, to Macon, and finally Atlanta. A graduate of Florida State University’s renowned meteorology program he also has the Seal of Approval from the National Weather Association and is recognized as being a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist by the American Meteorological Society. Chris was the first meteorologist in northwest Florida to hold that distinction.

In his spare time you can find Chris staying active and enjoying the beaches of the Emerald Coast. He enjoys Crossfit and is on the board of directors for the Panama City Area Seminole Club. A little known fact is that he is also an ordained minister and performs many beach weddings.

Chris Smith
Chief Meteorologist, WJHG-TV


NBC News Headlines

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Melissa Etheridge to sing national anthem at Chiefs-Patriots game

The rock star and lesbian icon hails from Kansas and says she was “raised a Chiefs fan.”

14-year-old with airsoft gun shot dead by Arizona police officer

The weapon found near the unidentified 14-year-old was a replica 1911 model airsoft gun, which police believe was stolen from the car.

Newspaper apologizes to family for not publishing mother's anti-Trump obit

“Her passing was hastened by her continued frustration with the Trump administration" was the line the Louisville Courier Journal took issue with.

This Air Force officer's life changed when she converted to Islam

Many Muslims in the Air Force hide their faith to avoid harassment. Because of this, the majority of openly-practicing Muslims are converts—they entered the military as one faith and switched to Islam.