Chris Smith

Chief Meteorologist

Connect With Me

chris.smith@wjhg.com


Chris Smith has been the chief meteorologist for the VIPIR7 Storm Team since October 2009. He came to NewsChannel 7 from CNN where he was a meteorologist for CNN, CNN International, and HLN.

Chris and his wife, Maurissa, knew northwest Florida was where they wanted to live and start a family... putting them close to his parents in South Walton and his in-laws in Southwest Georgia. Since moving here they had a son, Charlie.

Chris has more than 20 years of experience. His career has taken him across the Peach State… from Albany, to Macon, and finally Atlanta. A graduate of Florida State University’s renowned meteorology program he also has the Seal of Approval from the National Weather Association and is recognized as being a Certified Broadcast Meteorologist by the American Meteorological Society. Chris was the first meteorologist in northwest Florida to hold that distinction.

In his spare time you can find Chris staying active and enjoying the beaches of the Emerald Coast. He enjoys Crossfit and is on the board of directors for the Panama City Area Seminole Club. A little known fact is that he is also an ordained minister and performs many beach weddings.

Chris Smith
Chief Meteorologist, WJHG-TV


NBC News Headlines

Four executed after being 'led' to basement of Philadelphia home

Four people were found shot to death execution-style in the basement of a Southwest Philadelphia home on Monday.

Police officer, 2 staffers killed in shooting at Mercy Hospital in Chicago

"The city of Chicago lost a doctor, a pharmaceutical assistant and a police officer — all going about their day, all doing what they love."

Think climate disasters are bad now? Just wait

“The evidence was absolutely mind-blowing to me," said the lead researcher.

One killed, four injured in downtown Denver shooting

"Downtown is a very populated area, and so to have multiple gunshots fired in an area like this is concerning."

Family sues after girl is electrocuted by touching resort's handrail, leaving her severely brain-damaged

The handrail had 120 volts of electricity going through it, more than 10 times the amount needed to power its lights, according to the complaint.